Z556: System Analysis and Design

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Reading List

 

BASIC CONCEPTS IN SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

Session 1: Introduction

Holtzblatt, K. & Beyer, H. (2017). Contextual design: Design for life (2nd ed.). Chapter 1. Introduction, pp. 3–21. [Canvas]

 

DEFINING THE PROBLEM

Session 2: Introduction to user–centered analysis and design & Problem definition

Davis, W. S. (1994). Business Systems Analysis and Design. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. Chapter 2, Recognizing and defining the problem, p. 25–57 [Canvas]

A case study: The perils of ignoring "systems 101": Recovering from Mishaps at two small companies. [Canvas]

Satzinger, J. W. (2009). Systems analysis and design in a changing world (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Course Technology. Chapter 1: The world of the information systems analyst. Read p. 2–27. [Canvas]

Session 3: Contextual Inquiry & Teamwork activity

Holtzblatt, K. & Beyer, H. (2017). Contextual design: Design for life (2nd ed.). Chapter 3, Principles of contextual inquiry. [Canvas]

Lewis, J. P. (2006). The project manager's desk reference: A comprehensive guide to project planning, scheduling, evaluation, and systems. New York: McGraw–Hill. Chapter 2, A model for managing projects, p. 31–46. [Canvas]

Ante, S. E. (2006, June 5). The science of desire. BusinessWeek. [online]

Additional readings:

Anderson, K. (2009). Ethnographic research: A key to strategy. Harvard Business review, 87(3), 24. [Canvas]

Session 4: Project management & Information gathering

Lewis, J. P. (2006). The project manager's desk reference: A comprehensive guide to project planning, scheduling, evaluation, and systems. New York: McGraw–Hill. Section 3, Project scheduling, 123–160. [Canvas]

Valacich, J. S., George, J. F., & Hoffer, J. A. (2012). Essentials of Systems Analysis & Design. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Chapter 5, Determining system requirements, 122–146. [Canvas]

Block, P. (2011). Flawless consulting: A guide to getting your expertise used. (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Pfeiffer & Company. Chapter 13, Get the Picture. [Canvas]

Feiler, B. (2015, April 24). How can kids help parents manage their family? Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode, “Getting Organized.” [online]

Additional readings:

Wood, L.E. (1997). Semi–structured interviewing for user–centered design. Interactions, 4(2), 48–61. [online]

 

MODELS OF WORK IN ORGANIZATIONS

Session 5: Work Models

Alter, S. (2003). Customer service, responsibility, and systems in international e–commerce: Should a major airline reissue a stolen ticket? Communications of the AIS, 12(10), 146–154. [online]

Holtzblatt & Beyer (2017). Chapter 5, From data to insight. [Canvas]

Beyer & Holtzblatt (2005). Chapter 6, Work models – The flow model, p. 89–96; the sequence model, p. 96–101. [Canvas]

Lejk, M., & Leeks, D. (1998). An introduction to systems analysis techniques. London: Prentice Hall. Chapter 5, Specifying processes, p. 58–73. [Canvas]

Session 6: UML Overview

Bell, D. (2003). UML basics: An introduction to the Unified Modeling Language. [online]

Satzinger, J., Jackson, R.B., & Burd, S.D. (2016). Systems analysis & design in a changing world (7th ed.).
Chapter 3: Identifying user stories and use cases. [Canvas]
Chapter 5: Use case modeling [Canvas]

Schmuller, J. (1999). SAMS Teaching yourself UML in 24 hours. Hour 11 Working with activity diagrams. [Canvas]

Holtzblatt & Beyer (2017). Chapter 4, The Structure of an Interpretation Session. [Canvas]

Additional readings:

Chitnis, M., Tiwari, P., & Anathamuthy, L. (2003). Creating UML use diagrams. [online]

Session 7: More on Models

Beyer & Holtzblatt (2005). Chapter 6, Work models – The artifact, physical, & cultural models, p. 102–123. [Canvas]

Seidel, S., Recker, J., Pimmer, C., & vom Brocke, J. (2014). IT-enabled sustainability transformation--the case of SAP. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 35, Article 1. [online]

Additional readings:

Holtzblatt & Beyer (2017). Chapter 7, Building experience models. [Canvas]

Huang, K., & Deng, Y. (2008). Social interaction design in cultural context: A case study of a traditional social activity. International Journal of Design, 2(2). [online]

 

DATA MODELING

Session 8: Semantic modeling; Entity–relationship diagrams

Teorey, T. J. (2006). Database modeling & design. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.
Chapter 2, The Entity–Relationship model, p. 13–34. [Canvas]
Chapter 3, The Unified Modeling Language (UML), p. 35–53. [Canvas]

Podeswa, H. (2010). UML for the IT business analyst: A practical guide to requirements gathering using the unified modeling language (2nd ed.). Chapter 2: The BA's Perspective on Object Orientation? [Canvas]

Additional readings:

Harrington, J. L. (2002). Relational database design clearly explained (2nd ed.). Amsterdam: Morgan Kaufmann. Chapter 2: Entities and data relationships, p. 11–45. [Canvas]. Note: Read this if you are not familiar with E–R diagrams.

Carte, T. A., Jasperson, J. S., & Cornelius, M. E. (2006). Integrating ERD and UML concepts when teaching data modeling. Journal of Information Systems Education [online]

 

FROM ANALYSIS TO DESIGN

Session 9: Consolidation process

Block, P. (2011). Flawless consulting: A guide to getting your expertise used. (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Pfeiffer & Company.
Chapter 9: Dealing with resistance [Canvas]
Chapter 14: Preparing for feedback [Canvas]
Chapter 15: Managing the meeting for action. [Canvas]

Holtzblatt, K. & Beyer, H. (2017). Chapter 6, The affinity diagram. [Canvas]

Additional readings:

Beyer & Holtzblatt (2005). Chapter 9, Creating one view of the customer. [Canvas]

Session 10: User interface design & Usability testing

Garrett, J.J. (2011). The elements of user experience (2nd ed.). Chapters 1 and 2 [Canvas]

Holtzblatt, K. & Beyer, H. (2017). Chapter 17, Validating the design. [Canvas]

Denning, P. J. (2013). The profession of IT: Design Thinking. Communications of the ACM, 56(12), 29-31. [online]

Additional readings:

Schmettow, M. (2012). Sample size in usability studies. Communications of the ACM, 55(4), 64–70. [online]

 

IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES

Session 11: Data–driven design & Evaluating design alternatives

Shtub, A., Bard, J. F., & Globerson, S. (1994). Project Management: Engineering, Technology, and Implementation. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Section 3.4, 3.5, & 3.6 [Canvas]

Yen, D. C., & Davis, W. S. (1999). Risk–payoff analysis. In Davis, W. C., & Yen, D. C., The Information System Consultant's Handbook: Systems Analysis and Design. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 301–305. [Canvas]

Satzinger, J., Jackson, R., & Burd, S. (2009). Systems analysis & design in a changing world (5th ed.). Chapter 8 Evaluating alternatives for requirements, environment, and implementation. [Canvas]

Mind Tools. Force field analysis: Analyzing the pressures for and against change. [online]

Session 14: Change management

Holtzblatt, Wendell, & Wood, Chapter 16, Issues of organizational adoption. [e–book]

Ward, S. Writing the executive summary of the business plan. [online]

Gibson, J. E., Scherer, W. T., & Gibson, W. F. (2007). How to do systems analysis. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Chapter 10: The 10 golden rules of systems analysis. [Canvas]

Krotov, V., Boukhonine, S., & Ives, B. (2011) ERP implementation gone terribly wrong: The case of natural springs. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 28, Article 18. [online]



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